Pools open again…tips for starting back up from an idle

Pools open again…tips for starting back up from an idle

Some government agencies announced the opening of community pools in many areas of the state. As we understand, this does not mean municipal pools yet, but that should be happening soon. Many of the pools have been idled over the past months, and some have asked what are some to-do items.

When pools are idled, the flow is normally reduced and the chemical readings have been sometimes kept a bit lower than normal. There may be issues getting back up to full speed, so here is a quick checklist: 

  • Service your Control System: Many folks recommend that you clean sensors and calibrate readings for your test kit after any prolonged idling. This will get your system back in peak operating performance right away, or will flush out any issues that can be easily resolved with a $99 special visit from our tech team.
  • Service Chemical Feeders: Sometimes chemical feeders that sit too long develop issues with part of the tubing. Check tubing and replace all feeder tubes to get ready for full operation. This might also be a good time to check and verify or change suction and discharge tubing as well. You can handle this yourself, or contact us for the $99 special service from our tech team…. Your Choice.
  • Sanitize the Pool Deck:  It’s been recommended that you clean all deck equipment, wipe down all ladders and hand rails, and sanitize all surfaces that patrons will come in contact with on a daily basis. The easiest way is with the Wysiwash System… In stock and ready for action from CES.
  • Train New Pool Operators: If you have new operators, it is recommended that they be certified with a pool class that meets DOH codes. In keeping with social distancing, you can attend any upcoming CES AFO class, or for more immediate training, sign up for our Hybrid Online/Hands On AquaTech class. Your team can start learing today and become better operators tomorrow.
  • Watch for Water Quality Issues: Sometimes a pool gets “sick” when it gets shut down or idled for a while. We experienced this post-hurricane over the years. The best way to tell is the relationship between ORP and PPM it takes to get it to a specific ORP. So if you have a high ORP with a low PPM, the pool is in good shape. However if it takes a high PPM to get to a low ORP (<the DOH minimum of 700) then the pool is sick. You will normally need to shock the pool to fix the issue, and we recommend the Purolyte shock dosed per your CES Dosing Calculator. Need a copy of your calculator?  Call us.  

If you want to learn more about ORP, now might be a great time to sign up for our online ORP class. This is the same class that we have taught with the pool industry and department of health inspectors for over 15 years. If you wish to sign up, please us the discount code CESORP50 to get 50% off the class for a limited time.  Click on the link below or:

1.  Simply log on to ces.learnupon.com

2. Scroll down and Click “add” on     “Understanding (ORP) Oxidation Reduction     Potential”

3. Click “Proceed to Cart”, then “checkout”     and 

4. Click “have coupon code” and enter the     75% off coupon – CESORP50

5. Take the class and receive a certificate of     completion at the end.

In any event, we’re here to assist you in any way possible. Our service teams are busy, but there’s always room to help. Please let us know how we can assist.

Stay Safe

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